• carlina acaulis
  • bankplatz aussicht
  • hochstauden

  • eryngium alpinum
  • delphinium
  • offener zug
  • richtung rank
  • sommerpracht
  • visavis kalkschutt

Science

In addition to aesthetics and tourism, the scientific side is one of the most exciting and significant aspects of the Alpine Garden.

Since 1932, a lecture room has been available in the residential and study building as an ideal base for scientific research. To date, it has been used for over 120 courses for students from Bern University and advanced teacher training. A variety of seminar, diploma and PhD work has been carried out in the surroundings of the Alpine Garden.

Immediately after the founding of the Alpine Garden, Dr. Werner Lüdi carried out scientific experiments in the botanical garden itself and in an experimental meadow. In 1929 he created 46 permanent plots in five plant communities in the garden, documenting the species present in each plot. He carried out experimental intervention in 24 plots, (mowing, fertilization, stamping down to imitate grazing animals, seeding and weeding). He repeated documenting the species after 5 and 10 years, published the results in 1936 and 1940 and then ended the experiment. Regrettably these plots are no longer marked. Many can still be reasonably well located in relatively homogenous vegetation and in part display very clear and amazing dimensions,  however amazingly few changes can be seen in other vegetation.